5.11.2011

Prenatal testing: Alison's doing interviews

Alright, blog readers, the time has come to offer you this official, IRB-approved* invitation:

A student and I are going to begin a research project this summer about prenatal testing.  In particular, we want to learn about how individuals make decisions surrounding prenatal testing. Why do women choose to be tested?  What are they hoping to learn?  What information are they given that influences them?  What are the decision-making processes after the testing?

We’re interested in having conversations with individuals, either one-on-one or in focus groups, to discuss these questions.  This summer we’d like to talk with parents of children with disabilities.  Because there is a special emphasis on Down syndrome for prenatal testing, we’re particularly interested in talking with the parents of kids with Down syndrome.  We’re interested in talking with parents who decided to have prenatal testing as well as those who decided not to.

We’ll be asking questions about information not generally shared with people other than very close friends and family.  You can always let us know—up front or during the interview—what questions or topics you’d rather not answer or discuss.  We aren’t going to make value judgments about your choices or your life. We want to better understand the ways in which people make sense of prenatal testing as part of their pregnancy.

We’d like to know your story.  We will keep your information strictly confidential.  If you’re interested, or would like more information, please contact Alison Piepmeier at piepmeiera@cofc.edu or 843-953-2280.  (And we can do these as phone interviews or in person.)

*Approval code GJJQ-05-02-2011.

4 comments:

krlr said...

emailed you.

Erica said...

I think I shared this before but you should def read Tsipy Ivry's book on pregnancy in Japan and Israel.

Tricia said...

Did you finish your interviews?

Alison said...

Tricia, I have NOT finished my interviews--the project grew as I kept doing it, so it's become much larger than a summer thing. Interested in talking? I'll now email you and ask the same question.